IGF 2012, Baku did change anything?

IGF 2012, Baku did change anything? Looking backward to the Baku Internet Governance Forum did change anything or its just worsening? It was November 6-9, 2012, the Seventh Annual Meeting of the Internet Governance Forum was held in Azerbaijan, dedicated to the topic “Internet Governance for Sustainable Human, Economic and Social Development”. Over the first three days of the meeting, the participants discussed the topics of Emerging issues; Internet governance for development; Security, openness and privacy. The final day was dedicated to the closing ceremony. In the closing ceremony, it was Valentina Pellizzer (the executive directress of the Foundation OneWorld Platform for Southeast Europe) who was asked to address the participants on the behalf of the civil society. Following is Valentina’s full address: Good afternoon, I am very honored to be here and to speak on behalf of Civil Society, in my speech I will elaborate five points: Trust; Leaving our own/ stepping out from our comfort zone; Term of Services; Autocracy 2.0; Guaranteeing human rights online as much offline. Trust! Government does not have the answer. Business does not have the answer. Civil society has to propose its answer which is dialogue on the unavoidable human rights framework which is the only one that allows respect for the smallest in the community: the single individual/person. Those individuals can be looked as user, consumers but primarily they are citizens. And in them reside the legitimacy we all need to derive from. And this legitimacy asks for open protocols and not for closed ones. Trust should be our default on privacy but also on security, trust that can generate and host dissent and relegate censorship to...

Nnenna Nwakanma: Internet governance needs participation, infrastructure and neutrality

Nnenna Nwakanma: Internet governance needs participation, infrastructure and neutrality Author: Dejan Georgievski The way forward for Internet Governance will need consideration of issues of participation of all stakeholders, proper resources and changes in the current process of internet governance, said Nnenna Nwakanma, the Africa Regional Coordinator of the World Wide Web Foundation in her address at the Netmundial Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance, held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, April 23-24, 2014.   Following is the integral text of Nwakanma’s address, as delivered in Sao Paulo. Your Excellencies Colleagues, present and remote Ladies and gentlemen Bon dia!! My name is Nnenna. I come from the Internet. I also come from diverse civil society teams and networks. My first is the team at the World Wide Web Foundation. At the Web Foundation, we are engaged in the Alliance for Affordable Internet, in the Web We Want Campaign, in the Web Index and in Open Government data. I work to establish the open Web as a global public good and a basic right, ensuring that everyone can access and use it freely. That is what I do for a living. I also belong to the Best Bits Civil Society platform, the Internet Governance Caucus for 12 years and the Africa Internet Governance Forum. For me, Netmundial, in convening us to take a critical look at the principles and the roadmap for the future of Internet Governance, avails us with an opportunity to bring key issues to fore The first is Access As much as two-thirds of the world’s population is not connected to the Internet. The penetration rates in less developed countries average around 31%. In the African...

Croatia: Dislike for hatred

Croatia: Dislike for hatred Author: Sanela Gojak The Government of Croatia has joined the Council of Europe Campaign NO to hate speech on the Internet, which was recently officially presented. By the end of December, the campaign No to hate speech on the Internet will be implemented at the national level. The overall objective of the campaign is to inform and sensitize the public, especially children and youth, about respect for human rights as well as about the negative effects of hate speech. Young people, with their proactive action on the internet, at school and in the community, will raise awareness of themselves and others about what is hate speech and what the consequences of such an unacceptable way of expression may have. Certain activities of the campaign will focus primarily on children and young people aged 13 to 19 years (activities to be implemented in schools), and other activities will include a broader population of children and youth. In addition to addressing the negative consequences of hate speech on the Internet, the activities should encourage to respect human rights and to respect diversity which have the basis in national origin, race, ethnicity, skin colour, economic status/financial status, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation and so on. Among these activities, the campaign No to hate speech on the Internet, whose promotional video can be seen here, will have other offline activities: seminars, events, youth flash-mob etc. (Source: Netokracija Photo:...

FTX – Feminist tech exchange and the Launch of Macedonian Platform for Mapping of Violence

FTX – Feminist tech exchange and the Launch of Macedonian Platform for Mapping of Violence Author: Dejan Georgievski The Macedonian version of the mapirajnasilje.net platform for mapping of violence against women was launched on December 6, 2013 in Veles, under the auspices of the regional “Take Back the Tech” campaign, part of the global 16 Days of Activism Campaign. The launch took part under the auspices of the Feminist Tech Exchange – FTX that the Veles-based FOKUS Foundation, the Foundation OneWorld Platform for SEE and the Ženskaposla.ba portal organized in Veles (December 4-7, 2013). The FTX event included a series of lectures on the subject of using of multimedia tools for activism and promotion of women’t human rights. The FOKUS Foundation, OneWorldSEE and Ženskaposla.ba joined forces in the campaign focused on the power of technology to influence public awareness about this problem. The Take Back the Tech (TBTT) campaign creates actions, educates, promotes discussion about violence in the digital domain which remains largely invisible, often not even defined as a form of violence and is almost an absolute “taboo”. “The main goal of the campaign is to prevent the violence against women through the use of information and communication technologies. Map it!! Join the initiative!”, say the organizers of the campaign in Macedonia. TBTT calls on women and girls to take back the control over the technology to tell their personal stories, present themselves and take the initiative to shape the story of violence faced by women and girls all over the world. “We demand from the world to see what it wants to ignore, or wants to view it only as something that needs to shock or horrify us. And to hold accountable...

2013 Take Back the Tech Campaign Launched

Author: Dejan Georgievski The “16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence” is a global campaign joined by 1,700 organizations in more than 100 countries all over the world. The 2013 campaign officially started yesterday, November 25, on the International Day for Elimination of Violence against Women, and will be concluded on December 10, on the International Human Rights Day. Women and men all over the world join forces and call for elimination of all forms of violence against women and girls. The OneWorld Platform i the ženskaposla.ba portal again joined, for the sixth year in a row, the Take Back the Tech campaign which focuses on the power of technology to influence the public awareness about the problem of gender-based violence, creative actions, education, debate, exposing violence in the digital domain that remains largely invisible and unrecognized as a form of violence and also an absolute taboo. The main goal of the campaign is to prevent the violence to which women are subjected through their use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Throughout history, violence against women was viewed as a private, rather than public matter. The abuse was used as an instrument to keep the women away from the public space. Today, that public space has extended to include the virtual domain which reflects all the patterns of behavior and opinion from the real world. The women are again silenced, intimidated, humiliated and abused through the channels of ICTs. This year’s campaign started with a call for recognition of our rights to privacy in the digital world, with emphasis on the fact that the right to privacy is...

“Like” yourself to jail: New Laws to restrict online speech

“Like” yourself to jail: New Laws to restrict online speech Author: Dejan Georgievski The 8th Meeting of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) was held on October 22-25, 2013, in Bali, Indonesia. Aida Mahmutović, who together with Valentina Pellizzer represented the Foundation OneWorld Platform for Southeast Europe in IGF2013, collected several important conclusions related to the new legislation that limits freedom of expression on the internet all over the world.   Do you think about the consequences before you upload, share, comment or like something on your favourite social media. Do you feel more free to express your opinion online? You don’t go out personally to support peaceful protests because you are afraid you might get into trouble, so you rather stay home feeling free and safe to support by posting online? MAYBE in our country this is the case, but just some recent cases in the world where freedom to “click” “like” or “comment online” got people in a big trouble made me wonder are we just waiting for the same?! In 26 of 60 countries there are new laws or directives that negatively impact Internet freedom. In 26 countries a user was arrested for posting on social media: – woman arrested in India for “liking” friend’s comment on Facebook; – student arrested in Ethiopia for criticizing the “rampant corruption” at local university; – at least 10 users arrested in Bahrain for “insulting the King on Twitter”; – a student received 18 month in prison in Morocco for “attacking the nation’s sacred values” after making fun of the King on Facebook… Should we consider ourselves lucky that we are still free to “express” ourselves online? Are we free or...